Posts for category: Child Care

By A to Z Pediatrics
October 17, 2018
Category: Child Care
Tags: Sports Injuries  

Even though you try as hard as possible to keep your child safe while they are playing sports, accidents still happen. At these moments, it’s important that you know whether these are injuries that can easily be treated from the comfort of your own home or whether you need to turn to a pediatrician for proper medical attention.

Pediatricians have seen a lot of sports-related injuries over the years and while we also focus as much of our attention on prevention, we know the importance of being able to get immediate and comprehensive care when your child does sustain an injury.

Common sports-related injuries include:

  • Dislocations (particularly in the shoulder)
  • Traumatic injuries (this includes cuts, sprains and strains, and broken bones)
  • Stress fractures
  • Tendinitis (often in the hand or wrist)
  • Concussion

When a dislocation happens many times it is accompanied by an audible popping sound at the moment that the injury occurred. This unnerving sound is often followed by sudden and intense pain. It’s important that you turn to a pediatrician who can put the shoulder or any other area of the body back in place. The joints of a child’s body are looser than adults, so it makes shoulders and other areas more prone to dislocations.

Minor cuts, sprains, and strains can often be handled with at-home care. In most cases, the RICE method is a great way to ensure that your child gets the rest they need to heal properly and to stay off of the injury until it fully heals. Icing and elevating the injured area can also reduce pain and swelling. Of course, if you suspect that your child has a broken bone, this will need to be evaluated by a medical professional right away.

Children who are serious or long-term athletes are more likely to experience overuse injuries. These injuries occur over time rather than suddenly and they are often the result of performing repetitive movements. Overuse injuries include stress fractures and tendinitis. If your child feels pain whenever they move a certain area of the body or if they notice pain or swelling in a certain area it’s important that they get checked out.

Wearing a helmet is crucial for protecting your child’s head while playing sports. Of course, if your child has received a blow to the head and is experiencing dizziness, fatigue, frequent or severe headaches or just seems out of sorts it’s crucial that you bring them in right away to see if they’ve incurred a concussion.

When in doubt, pick up the phone and talk to a pediatrician about your child’s injuries and symptoms. They will be able to determine whether or not they should come in for proper care.

By A to Z Pediatrics
September 14, 2018
Category: Child Care

No two children are ever the same and while you certainly want to let your child discover their unique personality it is important to know when these differences in your little one might mean that it’s time to schedule a behavioral or development consultation with a pediatrician.

Whether you’ve noticed that your child has difficulty making friends, doesn’t have any interests or seems to throw more temper tantrums then other kids their age, it’s important to not only be able to pinpoint these differences but also find out what might be causing them. This is where a behavioral or developmental consultation could benefit both your child and your family.

When you hear the words “behavioral consultation” it sounds pretty disconcerting; however, there are many reasons why parents bring their children in for these visits. Perhaps your preschooler hasn’t started talking yet, or your child has difficulties interacting socially with other children. Maybe their academics are falling behind or they aren’t able to keep up with the challenges of school. When scenarios like this arise a behavioral consultation is the best way to be able to figure out what might be going on and what our pediatric team can do to help get your child back on track.

While some of these situations may be due to behavioral disorders, it is also possible that there are certain developmental delays that could also be responsible for these behaviors. There are developmental milestones that every child must reach physically and mentally. No matter whether your child is displaying signs of an autism spectrum disorder or ADHD, or is having difficulties with social situations, sleep, anxiety, aggression or impulsivity, it is important that they visit a children’s doctor for an evaluation.

Whatever concerns you might have about your little one, it’s important that you turn to a pediatrician that you can trust to perform a thorough behavioral consultation while also providing compassionate care and support. It’s essential that your child has everything they need to be successful in their personal, academic and social life and by assessing, diagnosing and treating any behavioral or developmental disorders early, we can provide your child with the treatment they need to lead a healthy and happy life.

By A to Z Pediatrics
August 16, 2018
Category: Child Care

Find out the best ways to handle some of the most common childhood learning and development disabilities.

 

Even though there is more information than ever before regarding childhood developmental and learning disorders there are still so many things we don’t quite understand and there is also a lot of misinformation out there. The goal of your pediatrician is to provide you with all the information you and your child need to understand their learning or developmental disorder and the most effective treatments and interventions available.

What are the most common learning disabilities?

One of the most common learning disabilities is dyslexia, which can affect how a child understands what they’ve read. It may also affect comprehension, spelling and other facets of reading and learning.

ADHD is another common learning disability that affects millions of children. Children with ADHD have trouble concentrating on work and may easily get distracted. ADHD can affect a child’s school, home or social life.

Other learning disabilities include:

  • Dyscalculia
  • Dysgraphia
  • Processing deficits

What are the most common developmental disabilities?

A common developmental disorder is Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Since autism is a spectrum, symptoms will vary in type and severity. It can affect a child’s ability to socialize or pick up social cues from those around them. They may prefer to be alone or not to be touched. While there is no cure for autism there are ways to manage the symptoms.

What are my child’s treatment options?

It’s important that if you think your child might be struggling with a learning or developmental disorder that you talk to your pediatrician. There are many ways in which to treat these symptoms through medications, therapy, lifestyle changes and behavioral modifications, and your doctor will work with you to determine the best treatment options for your child.

No matter whether you have questions about your child’s learning or development disorder or your child is displaying symptoms of one of these delays, it’s important that you have a pediatrician you can turn to for answers, support and treatment options. After all, your family and your pediatrician are a team designed to help your child live the best possible life.

By A to Z Pediatrics
March 16, 2018
Category: Child Care
Tags: Nose Bleeds  

While nosebleeds can be scary for a child, they are rarely a cause for alarm. Nosebleeds are typically common in children ages 3 to 10 years, and will often stop on their own with safe treatment at home.  Our pediatrician is available to provide you with tips on how to properly stop a nosebleed.

If your child experiences a nosebleed, it is important to do the following to stop the bleeding:

  • Remain calm and reassure your child.
  • Gently pinch the soft part of the nose with a tissue or clean washcloth.
  • Keep pressure on the nose for about 10 minutes.
  • Do not have your child lean back, as this may cause blood to flow down the back of the throat.
  • Have your child relax after a nosebleed.
  • Discourage nose blowing, picking or rubbing, and any rough play.

If your child experiences frequent nosebleeds, contact your pediatrician for further diagnosis and treatment options.

By A to Z Pediatrics
March 02, 2018
Category: Child Care
Tags: Poisons   Safety  

Young children explore the world by putting things in their mouth. For this reason, more than one million children under the age of six are victims of accidental poisoning each year. To help protect and keep your child safe, your pediatrician offers advice for identifying and locking up toxic materials and knowing what to do if they touch, inhale or swallow something poisonous.

Common Examples

Medicines: Vitamins and minerals, cold medicine, allergy and asthma medicine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen

Household Products: moth balls, furniture polish, drain cleaners, weed killers, insect or rat poisons, lye, pant thinners, dishwasher detergent, antifreeze, windshield washer fluid, gasoline, kerosene, lamp oil

How to Poison Proof Your Home

To maintain a healthy, safe home, your pediatrician offers these safety rules:

  • Keep harmful products locked up and out of the reach of your child
  • Use safety latches or locks to keep drawers and cabinets closed tight
  • Take care during stressful times
  • Never refer to any type of medicine as candy
  • Don’t rely on child-resistant containers
  • Never leave alcohol within the reach of your child
  • Call the Poison Help Line at (800) 222-1222 or your pediatrician if your child swallows a substance that is not food
  • Keep products in their original containers, as to not confuse your child
  • Read labels before using any product
  • Always keep a watchful eye on your child
  • Check your home for old medications and dispose of them properly
  • Move purses, luggage and grocery bags away from prying hands

Talk to your pediatrician today for more information on how to properly poison proof your home. Each extra measure taken is important to protecting your child from harm in your home.